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We've seen many people use food as 3D printer feed in the past, such as chocolates, candies and even ice cream. But can you imagine 3D printing anything using bananas? Sounds hard, if not, well, bananas -- but 3Digital Cooks' founder Luis Rodriguez Alcalde isn't one to shy away from a good challenge. So, for his latest project, he explored how to print out solid objects using banana mush and his self-designed extruder for 3D printers called PLYUMP. As you can imagine, pureed banana can't hold shape on its own, so Alcalde had to use potato starch as a thickener. His first attempt ended up lumpy and brownish, and honestly, quite terrifying to look at.

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Canadian flag in map

In addition to making excellent poutine and maple syrup, our friendly neighbors to the north are also pretty adept at prepping students for the future we live in too. The International Computer Literacy Study recently looked at 60,000 eighth graders from Ontario and assessed their proficiencies at copying and saving a document in addition to modifying info and using a handful of applications simultaneously. The CBC says this is the first international test of its kind, and that the Canucks scored 547 out of 600 in computer literacy -- much higher than the average score of 500. What's more, it's in a "statistical tie" with Australia and the Czech Republic for the top spot.If the CEO of the Education Quality and Accountability Office is to be believed, this is a direct result of Ontario's investments in putting technology in the classroom. Maybe SimCity can move into the Great White North's classroom and train up the next set of civil engineers, too.

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Well hello there, I'm Augustus Q. Moneybags, inventor of the word "Funtrepreneur" and thrillionaire owner of Military Industrial Complex LLC. Now, I may be an internationally loved businessman, y'see, but that doesn't mean I'm too good at calculatin' those ol' numbers, y'see. Now, however, I don't have to, since I've been using this software from the nerds over at investment bank Fidelity that runs on those Oculus Rift doohickeys. Strap it onto your face and you're magically transported to a world of skyscrapers, each one representin' a stock in your portfolio, y'see.

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Looking for a new computer monitor? If you're rocking an AMD-sourced graphics card, you may want to wait a few months. Samsung just announced the UD590 and UE850, the first two monitors with support for FreeSync -- AMD's open-source answer to NVIDIA G-Sync. Both technologies sync GPU output to the monitor's refresh rate, a trick that eliminates visual stutters and tearing. So, what's the difference? As an open standard, AMD's kit is free to implement, meaning Samsung can integrate it into its new monitors without paying out licensing fees. Samsung hasn't announced pricing yet, but says the monitors will be available in 23.6, 27 and 31.5-inch variants.

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We'll be seeing the next-generation Chevy Volt in less than two months when GM launches it at the North American International Auto Show in January. But, for the sake of those who can't wait, the company has shown off a bit more of the 2016 hybrid model at an event in Los Angeles. While the first photo that came out in August only displayed the vehicle's logo, this series of images (there are more after the break) shows almost the whole front end with its redesigned silver grille and angular headlights. We still don't know if it's going to be significantly cheaper than its predecessor, but General Motors has at least revealed that the car will boast GPS location-based charging.

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Have you ever walked into a beer or wine store only to be overwhelmed by the vast selection, including many options you'd never even heard of? We've all been there, but there's a new app that should help recommend options you've yet to taste. Next Glass uses your phone's camera to scan a bottle before offering you a score as to whether or not you'd like it. Based on ratings submitted the first time the app gets fired up, and scores continually added along the way, the software uses its so-called Genome Cellar to sift through a beer or wine's chemistry and predict your taste preferences. While you're browsing the shelves, the app can be used in beer, wine or a "both" modes for targeted queries, should the need arise. Once a bottle is scanned, you can also peruse to your friends list to see if others will dig your selection at dinner, add specific tasting notes and leverage the GlassMatch tool to find similar beverages. Ready to give it a go? Next Glass is free in both iTunes and Google Play.

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Are you ready to spend even more money at Amazon? According to Skift, Amazon is preparing its own travel service, focused on independent hotels and resorts near major US cities, including New York, Los Angeles and Seattle. The travel news site discovered that two independent hotels have already signed up to the service and one that was strongly considering doing so. Amazon would reportedly house a curated range of hotels within a few hours' drive from those aforementioned cities.

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Alan Turing has long been regarded as the father of modern computing. Why? We're glad you asked. Today, we dive into the history of the Turing machine, go hands-on with Ricoh's new Theta camera, and take a look at Corning's new Gorilla Glass 4. Read on for Engadget's news highlights from the last 24 hours.

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Accidents happen, and for Airbnb guests, it could take place while navigating an unfamiliar home. It would come as no surprise if people ended up arguing on who should foot the bill, so Airbnb has decided to make it easier on all its customers by launching a $1 million Host Protection Program. It's a completely different entity from the $1 million Host Guarantee, which promises to reimburse home owners for any damage to their properties. This program covers not only Airbnb hosts, but also their landlords, in case a guest gets injured inside their house or building during a stay and makes a claim against them. As you'd expect, though, there are exceptions, including injuries caused by defects in the property, or (gulp) those that were intentionally inflicted by the hosts themselves.

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Fans of A&E's Longmire were pretty vocal when the network announced it would part ways with the series after a massive cliffhanger at the end of season 3. Well, the show will live on at the hands of Netflix. The streaming service nabbed the rights to the fourth season that's set to include ten episodes arriving in 2015. As Deadline Hollywood reported back in August, the show's demographic is much older than most A&E shows, but Longmire had the highest viewership of any scripted series on the channel. If you aren't familiar, the plot centers around rural Wyoming sheriff Walt Longmire and his crime-fighting chronicles based on the novels of Craig Johnson -- including a series-spanning search for his wife's killer. The set of new episodes will air in the US, Canada, Australia and New Zealand when they stream next year.

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